Motivational Quote #1

“What to do with a mistake: recognise it, admit it, learn from it, forget it”
–Dean Smith–

A couple of weeks ago I got very grumpy with myself at Nomads HFT (read about it here). So last week I stuck a famous quote on my stock to give me something to reflect on if it the shoot wasn’t going to plan. It seemed to work and I was much cheerier, even with a lower score. 

Sometimes we just need a reminder close to hand. This might be a reminder of why we go out and shoot at the weekend, a reminder of bad habits, or something to remind us to keep enjoying our sport.

This weeks quote is a reminder to not reflect on that shot you just missed, but instead to learn what you can from it, and move on. Each target can be seen as a separate opportunity to do well. A crappy shot on the previous lane has no bearing on this one, so don’t dwell on it!

“What to do with a mistake: recognise it, admit it, learn from it, forget it”
–Dean Smith–

Read a bit about Dean Smith HERE

I’ve got a couple of examples to put this in the context of HFT:

Example 1: You pull the trigger on your PCP but the pellet probe is still out and you score nothing. That’s a mistake I’ve seen a few times and I’m sure plenty of people have done it.
 

Recognise it
The pellet didn’t come out of the gun, and a 0 has gone down on your score card. Definitely a mistake

Admit it
This was your mistake and could have been avoided.  Maybe you were feeling rushed, or were trying to get a shot away before the wind picked up again.

Learn from it
You could start a pre-shot routine to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Make checking the probe is in a fundamental part of your shot and practice doing it until it is ingrained in your muscle memory.

Forget it 
You can’t change what has happened, and there is no reason for it to happen on the next lane, or on any other lanes coming up. Dwelling on it will cause anxiety or stress which will negatively impact your performance.

 

Example 2. You are looking through a tunnel of trees at a target with the sun shining on it at the other end. There is a big blob of history underneath the target but your reticle is very clear. You ignore the history and range 25 yards because the scope is so clear. Your pellet falls bang on top of every one else’s, underneath the kill zone. 

Recognise it
The mistake here was ignoring the history. The way the target was placed made range finding tricky, and the sun shining on it tricked your scope/eye into thinking it was closer than it actually was.

Admit it
You made a mistake. Experience should have told you that the bright sun would make range finding by parallax tricky.

Learn from it
Make a mental note, the lighting conditions tricked you but now you will know to look out for this in the future. The course setter might have used this trick somewhere else and you are better prepared now.

Forget it 
You didn’t judge the range well but don’t take this attitude to the next target. Thinking that your range finding is off could have you second guessing the up-coming targets. Don’t start adding 10 yards to your first guess just because you came up shot this time. Range find the next lane exactly as you normally would (unless its a similar range trap of course!)

 

I don’t know what next week’s quote will be. That could depend entirely on how tomorrow turns out. It’s Round 3 of the Daystate Midland Hunter Series, this time at Furnace Mill.
My goal is to get a score above 85%. This would be a maximum score of 51 (if someone clears the course). The way other people have been shooting recently, I don’t think this will get me on the recoiling podium, but it would be a big step in the right direction and set me up nicely for Round 4.

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